March 25, 2019: 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Kalona Chamber Meeting Room: 514 B Avenue, Kalona, IA 5224
Registration is encouraged: click here

The importance and benefits of blood donation will be highlighted during the Kalona Area Chamber of Commerce monthly luncheon on Monday, March 25. 

Jessie Hinrichs, MSEd, Blood Donor Coordinator for the DeGowin Blood Center at the University of Iowa Hospitals and clinics will be the featured speaker at the luncheon. There will be a blood drive at the First Responders Building (104 6th Street) in Kalona on Wednesday, May 8th from 2PM to 7PM.  

Hinrichs points out the one of the benefits of donating blood is you get a free mini-physical including a blood pressure check, iron level test, and an infection screening which helps to reduce the risk of heart disease.

One donation burns up to 650 calories and helps to reduce the risk of cancer. Plus you find out your blood type.

“All products we collect are typed and tested for nine different infectious diseases,” Hinrichs pointed out.

The reason people donate blood include friends or relatives needing blood units and helping people in disasters receive donations. Some people get a sense of importance being able giving for charitable reasons.

Every year UIHC transfuse 24,000 units mainly from blood donations like in Kalona and at the hospital.

Blood may be needed for a variety of reasons including for patients receiving organ transplants, cancer, therapies and bone marrow transplants. Blood is also needed for survival of premature babies, patients undergoing heart surgery and survival of accident victims.

You can find more information by going to https://uihc.org/health-topics/receiving-blood,

Some interesting facts about the people making blood donations and those needing blood donations at UIHC include:

  • Approximately 94,000 Patients seen each year
  • Almost 60,000 Emergency Department visits each year
  • Approximately 30,000 major surgical operations take place

Blood donations in Kalona have been on the decline in recent years. Donors have fallen from 204 in spring of 2004 to 56 in October of 2018.

“We invite and encourage more donors to give this spring,” commented Hinrichs.

Chamber Contributing Author: Ron Slechta